NATURE INSPIRED ART: Tackling a large encaustic

SEEDING

Small encaustic paintings like the 6X6 one above have been leaving my studio pretty regularly. Lately, I’m trying my hand on a large format encaustic. The wax begins to harden the second you remove the brush from the pot, so it is a real challenge to work on something larger than 8X8 or 10X10.

Just to cover the surface takes some time and maneuvering stretching my body across the board. I lay the 24X36 piece on the floor and bring the heating tray to the floor as well. I continue to lay in the wax and colors until the surface is covered. Then I need to fuse it to the layer below.

After 2 days of work and slowly building up layers, textures and colors, I’m left with the image below. Almost done. Now I begging to add the colors I want to be in the main and finished piece.

stage3large

I brush on the wax with the colors I want for the finalized painting, continuing to fuse the new layer to the previous layers by torching the wax until it begins to glisten. I intentionally leave the bottom portion deeply textured, but smooth out the top third of the painting. A heated iron works well. Then I finish off by scratching in a few connecting lines and lightly torch. Below is the finished 24X36, Listening to Silence, encaustic on cradled board.

listeining_2_silence4w

It is on display at my studio, Osprey Studio, this week-end, during the Alamance Studio Tour. Saturday, Oct. 18, 10-5 pm, and Sunday, Oct. 19, Noon – 5 pm. I’m # 12 on the tour.  DIRECTIONS.

For more information about the Alamance Studio Tour, visit HERE.

If you’d like to receive my monthly newsletter:

Advertisements

the ART OF FRAMING

MOORED, Oil on masonite by Jude Lobe

MOORED, Oil on masonite by Jude Lobe

An artist’s hardest decision is deciding on a frame for the artwork. For a time, I didn’t frame paintings and they looked pretty good as long as they were deep canvases. However, I always thought the frame enhanced the art and brought the viewer’s eye more directly to the painting.

Why frame: Frames make the artwork look more professional. They protect it and make it more sturdy. A proper frame can enhance the visual allure of the artwork. And finally, what would convince most artists is framed art sells more easily.

 An easy no-brainer for deep canvases is the Floater Frames. They are fabulous for canvases and cradled boards, like the ones I use in my cold wax and oil paintings. The have a clean, contemporary look and don’t fight for attention with the art. 

My quandary: My dilemma  comes when I’m looking for a frame for a oil painting, like Moored, the oil painting of a boat moored at Hilton Head pictured above. It was done on masonite. I don’t want a too decorative frame that will detract from the artwork, but I also don’t want it too plain so that it doesn’t add anything. There lies the perplexity. And then there is the consideration of who would buy the painting and would my expenditure for an expensive frame pay off in a sale.

Why to not Frame: Then there is the idea that perhaps the frame would effect the viewer negatively. Suppose the viewer is a light maple wood person and dark mahogany has them running in the opposite direction.  It is certainly impossible to find a frame that matches every decor. And if an art buyer wants their frame to match the decor, well, that’s money the artist spent paying for a frame that flows down the drain. 

What to do: Well, for the art above, I’m asking you to give me your opinion of the three considerations I have above for the frame for Moored. Which do you prefer? I really want to know.

HEALING EFFECTS OF ART

Marsh at Dusk, oil painting, by Jude Lobe, 20X60, $1250.

Marsh at Dusk, oil painting, by Jude Lobe, 20X60, $1250.

You walk into a gallery, store or even restaurant, and see a painting that grabs your attention. You relate to it. It takes you somewhere else. It makes you feel. But did you also know art has healing benefits.

Scientific studies have shown that art heals by changing a person’s physiology and attitude. By looking at artworks or listening to music, a person’s brain wave pattern changes. One becomes less stressed and moves into relaxation. Think about the last time you were at an art gallery. How refreshed and calmed did you feel?
Also effected is our nervous system, our hormonal balance and our brain neurotransmitters. With all of our cells in our body instantly reacting to the art or music, our body’s physiology is altered and the immune system and blood flow to our organs is increased. After you walked out of that gallery, or spent time in the morning drinking your coffee while gazing at the picture you have hanging on the wall, ask yourself, “do you feel better and ready to face the day with a positive attitude?”
The next time you are having a stressed day, take some time off and go to a local art gallery and enjoy the art. When you walk back out the door, I bet you will find yourself in much better spirits and able to handle whatever it is you need to do.
Our physiology is deeply effected by feelings and emotion. Try to keep a balance of good feelings in close proximity to yourself during the day. Perhaps a small painting on  your desk, or larger one on the wall. Maybe a piece of art at home in your kitchen to look at before you walk out the door. Or a calming artwork on the wall of your bedroom to send you off to a peaceful night’s rest.
The artwork above is available at Anthm Gallery in Black Mountain. You can see more of my artwork at Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, 121 N. Churton St., Hillsborough, NC; Carlton Art Gallery in Banner Elk, NC; Carolina Creations, New Bern and on my website

 

WATERLILIES SEDUCTION

Ponderings, by Jude Lobe, Oil on linen, 30X40, $1250

Waterlilies will always be synonymous with Monet. Every time we see a painting of water lilies we can’t help but be reminded of his works. And so artists try and stay away from painting them, however, they seduce us with their perfect beauty. Not only their beautiful shapes of foliage and wide range of colors depending on the place in the sky from where the sun shines but also the place where they dwell. That amazing water that reflects the colors of the flowers, sky and trees. 

How can an artist hold back from trying to capture the beauty of those scenes. I certainly cannot. And so the artist unfairly risks the viewer commenting, “oh, copying Monet”. Of course, we are not. We are just as awestruck as Monet. As are photographer artists, yet lucky for them, they are never compared with Monet.

Water lilies not only are beautiful themselves, but they choose to dwell in the most serene and lovely surroundings. I suspect I will be painting them for many more years. There are different perspectives to choose, and times of day to confront and explore.

They also inspire poets and writers. Like this quote from Jacqueline Close Moore:

“A pristine waterlily undiscouraged by its surroundings, rises from the depths of a murky pond. It’s lotus petals perfume the air, as it flowers and blooms brilliantly, purely, divinely, despite and probably because of its origins. Becoming a spiritual person does not mean you to leave your prior life behind, but instead you integrate, learn, remember, and respect what brought you to this point  in the first place.” 

And Henry David Thoreau wrote,

“But it chanced the other day that I scented a white water-lily…. It is the emblem of purity…. What confirmation of our hopes is in the fragrance of this flower! “

Click here to visit my site.