INTERSECTIONS OF LIFE

Lingering Drop of Sun, 18X24 Encaustic by Jude Lobe

Lingering Drop of Sun, 18X24 Encaustic by Jude Lobe

In my INTERSECTIONS Series, my new works are created using Cold Wax & Oil or Encaustics. Intersections are junctions or where things come together. In life we come upon intersections, crossroads and forks in the road that change our course. Sometimes great success or happiness comes from intersecting our passion with our talents to work in harmony with the universe. In my life it is the intersection of the emotion I feel about the natural environment and how I can explain and explore it in art.

The above 18X24 on cradled board was inspired by this excerpt from Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.

“A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon and then dripped over and was gone, and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone, and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag, hung over the spot of its going. And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon, and darkness crept over the land from the east.”

IMAGE: Lingering Drop of Sun, Encaustic, 18X24X1.5, $775.

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ENCAUSTICS ARE HOT

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My Queendom for a Tree. encaustic painting, 6X6, by Jude Lobe. $140

My Queendom for a Tree. encaustic painting, 6X6, by Jude Lobe. $140

“To be poor and be without trees, is to be the most starved human being in the world. To be poor and have trees, is to be completely rich in ways that money can never buy.”

 ~ Clarissa Pinkola Estes. The Faithful Gardener: A Wise Tale About That Which Can Never Die

It happened quite unintentionally. Me creating with encaustics, that is. A friend wanted to know how to do encaustics, as she was considering pursuing it. I told her I wasn’t doing encaustics at this time, only cold wax & oil, but had the equipment and would get it out and show her the process.

And so I did. I pulled out the heating tray, the various small metal containers of mediums in which pigments of color were added, the large container holding the encaustic medium and array of natural brushes, each designated to their own colored container. Oh, and then there is the torch. Some of the colored pigments I brought back from a trip to Rousillon, Provence, France, known for their beautiful ochres. Others were given to me by a friend who brought them back from Peru, where she purchased them in a street market.

     I proceeded to grab a small 6X6X1.5″ gessoed board and began to brush the hot wax across it. After two thin coats, I then torched it, moving the torch around until all the wax glistened to fuse the layers. As it cooled, a smooth, flat surface appeared.
     This process went on for several layers. I also added some texture by layering hemp cord across the board and lightly pressing it into the soft wax. Again, back to the hot wax and brushing, first in one direction, then another, then torching it to glistening state. As the layers of color and texture built up, I would scratch into the surface where the painting was screaming for it. Finally, I figured the painting was complete. My friend decided it was too messy and is going to do cold wax & oil.
     Since I had all the equipment out and had one piece begun. . well, I just got hooked. I guess you might say, my spirit became ignited and it kindled a new desire to work in encaustics. I’m on fire. (ok, enough with the puns) I can’t help myself now. But they are all small pieces at this time. I may expand to a larger size for pieces for my opening in June at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts.