INTERSECTIONS OF LIFE

Lingering Drop of Sun, 18X24 Encaustic by Jude Lobe

Lingering Drop of Sun, 18X24 Encaustic by Jude Lobe

In my INTERSECTIONS Series, my new works are created using Cold Wax & Oil or Encaustics. Intersections are junctions or where things come together. In life we come upon intersections, crossroads and forks in the road that change our course. Sometimes great success or happiness comes from intersecting our passion with our talents to work in harmony with the universe. In my life it is the intersection of the emotion I feel about the natural environment and how I can explain and explore it in art.

The above 18X24 on cradled board was inspired by this excerpt from Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.

“A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon and then dripped over and was gone, and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone, and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag, hung over the spot of its going. And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon, and darkness crept over the land from the east.”

IMAGE: Lingering Drop of Sun, Encaustic, 18X24X1.5, $775.

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IT CAN DO A BODY GOOD.

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TWO TREES ON HORIZON, 8X18, Cold Wax & Oil, $375 (Click on image to visit website)

It doesn’t matter what time of year, how cold, how hot, when I see birds in a waterscape, peace flows over me. Birds give us so much just in their existing, yet many of us have no idea what their needs are for them to survive. We hear of birds becoming extinct when their native habitats disappear, but apparently it doesn’t sink in that the habitat didn’t have to disappear.

Ecology needs to be taught in school beginning very early so that it is ingrained. Then perhaps our planning boards wouldn’t thoughtlessly allow development everywhere. Perhaps, then, developers wouldn’t consider clear-cutting land to put up concrete parking lots and buildings. They would understand that trees don’t grow there just to be used to provide wood.

Hasn’t it occurred to everyone yet, that trees, their roots, their leave, are protecting our soils from erosion? Do they not understand that roots and leaves are absorbing and using the heavy rains that fall to grow. Haven’t they realized how much cooler in the summer it is to stand under a tree than lean against their car on a macadam parking lot? Please, take a walk in the forest and tell me trees aren’t important for controlling temperatures.

And the next time you take a deep breath remember to thank a tree for providing the oxygen and improving the air quality. Hmm. How wonderful when building roads to include a large medium strip with trees and plants.  Just imagine how that design might have changed the pollution levels in places like Peking and Los Angeles, not to mention making a pleasant drive home from work.

Yes, those beautiful trees aren’t there for us to cut down. Besides being a home for those beautiful birds, one acre of plants absorb six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. Plants filter the air by removing dust and absorbing other pollutants including carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide.

Let’s all go out and plant a tree or shrub. It can do a body good.

 

the ART OF FRAMING

MOORED, Oil on masonite by Jude Lobe

MOORED, Oil on masonite by Jude Lobe

An artist’s hardest decision is deciding on a frame for the artwork. For a time, I didn’t frame paintings and they looked pretty good as long as they were deep canvases. However, I always thought the frame enhanced the art and brought the viewer’s eye more directly to the painting.

Why frame: Frames make the artwork look more professional. They protect it and make it more sturdy. A proper frame can enhance the visual allure of the artwork. And finally, what would convince most artists is framed art sells more easily.

 An easy no-brainer for deep canvases is the Floater Frames. They are fabulous for canvases and cradled boards, like the ones I use in my cold wax and oil paintings. The have a clean, contemporary look and don’t fight for attention with the art. 

My quandary: My dilemma  comes when I’m looking for a frame for a oil painting, like Moored, the oil painting of a boat moored at Hilton Head pictured above. It was done on masonite. I don’t want a too decorative frame that will detract from the artwork, but I also don’t want it too plain so that it doesn’t add anything. There lies the perplexity. And then there is the consideration of who would buy the painting and would my expenditure for an expensive frame pay off in a sale.

Why to not Frame: Then there is the idea that perhaps the frame would effect the viewer negatively. Suppose the viewer is a light maple wood person and dark mahogany has them running in the opposite direction.  It is certainly impossible to find a frame that matches every decor. And if an art buyer wants their frame to match the decor, well, that’s money the artist spent paying for a frame that flows down the drain. 

What to do: Well, for the art above, I’m asking you to give me your opinion of the three considerations I have above for the frame for Moored. Which do you prefer? I really want to know.

WATERLILIES SEDUCTION

Ponderings, by Jude Lobe, Oil on linen, 30X40, $1250

Waterlilies will always be synonymous with Monet. Every time we see a painting of water lilies we can’t help but be reminded of his works. And so artists try and stay away from painting them, however, they seduce us with their perfect beauty. Not only their beautiful shapes of foliage and wide range of colors depending on the place in the sky from where the sun shines but also the place where they dwell. That amazing water that reflects the colors of the flowers, sky and trees. 

How can an artist hold back from trying to capture the beauty of those scenes. I certainly cannot. And so the artist unfairly risks the viewer commenting, “oh, copying Monet”. Of course, we are not. We are just as awestruck as Monet. As are photographer artists, yet lucky for them, they are never compared with Monet.

Water lilies not only are beautiful themselves, but they choose to dwell in the most serene and lovely surroundings. I suspect I will be painting them for many more years. There are different perspectives to choose, and times of day to confront and explore.

They also inspire poets and writers. Like this quote from Jacqueline Close Moore:

“A pristine waterlily undiscouraged by its surroundings, rises from the depths of a murky pond. It’s lotus petals perfume the air, as it flowers and blooms brilliantly, purely, divinely, despite and probably because of its origins. Becoming a spiritual person does not mean you to leave your prior life behind, but instead you integrate, learn, remember, and respect what brought you to this point  in the first place.” 

And Henry David Thoreau wrote,

“But it chanced the other day that I scented a white water-lily…. It is the emblem of purity…. What confirmation of our hopes is in the fragrance of this flower! “

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