Osprey Studio’s ENCAUSTIC Worshops

Have you seen hot wax (encaustic) paintings and wondered if you’d like to try it, but didn’t want to invest in all the materials until you were sure? You are in luck. Osprey Studio is now offering Encaustic workshops and supplying all the materials including the boards.

INTRODUCTION TO ENCAUSTIC PAINTING
One-day workshop: 10-2 pm.
Instructors: Jude Lobe & Carol Engler  
Location: Osprey Studio, Mebane, NC
Date: Saturday, July 23, 2016, 10-2pm.
Cost: $125 (Includes lunch, coffee/tea/wine)
All materials will be supplied including boards. At the end of the workshop you should have completed at least 2 works of art.

This workshop is designed to give one the basic information and techniques to get started creating in encaustics. In this workshop students will learn:

• Materials needed to begin working in encaustics.
• What type supports to use and how to prepare them.
• Creating colored wax from earth pigments.
• Embedding objects, fabric or paper into the painting.
• Fusing layers and learning heat control.
• Inscribing and making texture.
• Applying alcohol ink.
• Sources for supplies.

 


2-DAY ENCAUSTIC WORKSHOP & RETREAT
Instructors: Jude Lobe and Carol Engler
Location: Horseshoe Farm, Westfield, NC
Dates: Saturday & Sunday. Three sessions are set up. AUG 13/14, SEPT 17/18, & OCT 15/16
Cost: $300. (Includes overnight accommodations, Saturday lunch & dinner, Sunday breakfast and lunch)
Spend the night in the cabin on-site.  Limited to 5 persons.
All materials will be supplied. At the end of the workshop you should have completed at least 3 works of art.

Come spend the weekend in a beautiful venue to rejuvenate and learn encaustic painting. Spend free time hiking trails in the woods along the river and  lake, cooling off  in the swimming pool, and relaxing at night in the hot tub with a glass of wine.

We will have 3 sessions on Saturday with breaks for lunch and dinner. On Sunday we will begin with breakfast then have a session. There will also be some free time that you can work on your encaustics. After breaking for lunch, participants will have the afternoon to work on their own or enjoy the surroundings or both. If you want to hike on Sunday, a lunch bag with sandwich and drink will be prepared for you.

This lake is located at the bottom of the hill from the cabin.

This lake is located at the bottom of the hill from the cabin.

What will be covered
• Materials needed to begin working in encaustics
• What type supports to use and how to prepare them
• Creating colored wax from earth pigments
• Embedding objects, fabric or paper into the painting
• Fusing layers and learning heat control
• Inscribing and making texture
• Applying alcohol ink
• Sources for supplies

To sign up or see more information: CLICK HERE

THE PROCESS OF ENCAUSTICS

Encaustics have been around for quite awhile. At least 2000 years. At that time the Egyptians used encaustics to paint portraits on their mummies. Unsurprisingly, they still exist and colors are still brilliant.

HOW IS IT DONE (to visit my site, click on image)

Set up includes:

  • griddle,
  • metal pans,
  • natural hair brushes like hake brushes,
  • beeswax medium,
  • pigments,
  • torch with mapp gas or heat gun,
  • torch starter
  • paper towels,
  • and your substrate, a hard surface.

Why a hard surface?

Wax is not flexible. Linen and canvas stretch and tighten with the weather. You don’t want the wax to crack.

Beginning.

You begin by setting the heat to 200°. When the wax is liquid, brush on your surface. Put two layers down. You can brush across and down. Unless you are interested in a smooth finish. I usually begin with smooth layers. Each layer is fused to the layer underneath by heating. It cools in minutes, so you can continue to add layers. You can add texture any time by adding collage materials. You can prepare them by dipping in wax, or placing them directly on the warm wax. And you can add texture by scratching into the surface.

Finish.

Encaustics are naturally glossy. However, until they are totally cured (about 6 mos- 1 yr) the may get dull. You can polish the surface with a lint-free rag to keep its high gloss appearance.

NATURE INSPIRED ART: Tackling a large encaustic

SEEDING

Small encaustic paintings like the 6X6 one above have been leaving my studio pretty regularly. Lately, I’m trying my hand on a large format encaustic. The wax begins to harden the second you remove the brush from the pot, so it is a real challenge to work on something larger than 8X8 or 10X10.

Just to cover the surface takes some time and maneuvering stretching my body across the board. I lay the 24X36 piece on the floor and bring the heating tray to the floor as well. I continue to lay in the wax and colors until the surface is covered. Then I need to fuse it to the layer below.

After 2 days of work and slowly building up layers, textures and colors, I’m left with the image below. Almost done. Now I begging to add the colors I want to be in the main and finished piece.

stage3large

I brush on the wax with the colors I want for the finalized painting, continuing to fuse the new layer to the previous layers by torching the wax until it begins to glisten. I intentionally leave the bottom portion deeply textured, but smooth out the top third of the painting. A heated iron works well. Then I finish off by scratching in a few connecting lines and lightly torch. Below is the finished 24X36, Listening to Silence, encaustic on cradled board.

listeining_2_silence4w

It is on display at my studio, Osprey Studio, this week-end, during the Alamance Studio Tour. Saturday, Oct. 18, 10-5 pm, and Sunday, Oct. 19, Noon – 5 pm. I’m # 12 on the tour.  DIRECTIONS.

For more information about the Alamance Studio Tour, visit HERE.

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INTERSECTIONS OF LIFE

Lingering Drop of Sun, 18X24 Encaustic by Jude Lobe

Lingering Drop of Sun, 18X24 Encaustic by Jude Lobe

In my INTERSECTIONS Series, my new works are created using Cold Wax & Oil or Encaustics. Intersections are junctions or where things come together. In life we come upon intersections, crossroads and forks in the road that change our course. Sometimes great success or happiness comes from intersecting our passion with our talents to work in harmony with the universe. In my life it is the intersection of the emotion I feel about the natural environment and how I can explain and explore it in art.

The above 18X24 on cradled board was inspired by this excerpt from Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.

“A large drop of sun lingered on the horizon and then dripped over and was gone, and the sky was brilliant over the spot where it had gone, and a torn cloud, like a bloody rag, hung over the spot of its going. And dusk crept over the sky from the eastern horizon, and darkness crept over the land from the east.”

IMAGE: Lingering Drop of Sun, Encaustic, 18X24X1.5, $775.

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IT MAY BE RAINING; BUT THE SUN STILL SHINES

IT MAY BE RAINING; BUT THE SUN STILL SHINES, Encaustic Painting, 8X8, by Jude Lobe. $245

IT MAY BE RAINING; BUT THE SUN STILL SHINES, Encaustic Painting, 8X8, by Jude Lobe. $245

The encaustic painting involves using heated beeswax mixed with resin. I have a griddle set up with mini bread pans; one pan holds the medium (clear beeswax & resin), and several other smaller ones hold medium mixed with added powdered pigments.  My hope in beginning is too keep all the pots clean and separate, no mixing the brushes that are each assigned to a particular color. Only mixing on the griddle. But. . . .

just like when I am painting in oils, the enthusiasm and speed in adding paint to surface overtakes common sense, and by the end of the day, all my colored pots look quite different and I hardly remember with what colors I began. The griddle still becomes a beautiful palette at the end of the day, as it is so easy to mix colors on the griddle before applying to the board.

I’m also becoming a great fan of the torch and prefer using the torch to the heat gun. I seem to more easily get lovely smooth surfaces, with which I begin. Toward the end of the painting, though, I like adding texture, and I seem to be able to control the amount of heat and the spacial area that I heat with the torch.

The painting below began with pots of cobalt blue (yeah, that got mixed very quickly), yellow, sienna and red. The painting below is at the Joyful Jewel in Pittsboro, catty-corner from the fabulous restaurant, the Roadhouse.

WHY HANG ART IN YOUR HOME: Small paintings like these are great for hanging in small rooms, like the bathroom, kitchen, or mud room. Art has a way of inspiring you and lifting your spirit. Consider having a work of art to look at while washing your hands. It makes it a lovely experience.

Carolina Country, encaustic, 8X10

ENCAUSTICS ARE HOT

Image

My Queendom for a Tree. encaustic painting, 6X6, by Jude Lobe. $140

My Queendom for a Tree. encaustic painting, 6X6, by Jude Lobe. $140

“To be poor and be without trees, is to be the most starved human being in the world. To be poor and have trees, is to be completely rich in ways that money can never buy.”

 ~ Clarissa Pinkola Estes. The Faithful Gardener: A Wise Tale About That Which Can Never Die

It happened quite unintentionally. Me creating with encaustics, that is. A friend wanted to know how to do encaustics, as she was considering pursuing it. I told her I wasn’t doing encaustics at this time, only cold wax & oil, but had the equipment and would get it out and show her the process.

And so I did. I pulled out the heating tray, the various small metal containers of mediums in which pigments of color were added, the large container holding the encaustic medium and array of natural brushes, each designated to their own colored container. Oh, and then there is the torch. Some of the colored pigments I brought back from a trip to Rousillon, Provence, France, known for their beautiful ochres. Others were given to me by a friend who brought them back from Peru, where she purchased them in a street market.

     I proceeded to grab a small 6X6X1.5″ gessoed board and began to brush the hot wax across it. After two thin coats, I then torched it, moving the torch around until all the wax glistened to fuse the layers. As it cooled, a smooth, flat surface appeared.
     This process went on for several layers. I also added some texture by layering hemp cord across the board and lightly pressing it into the soft wax. Again, back to the hot wax and brushing, first in one direction, then another, then torching it to glistening state. As the layers of color and texture built up, I would scratch into the surface where the painting was screaming for it. Finally, I figured the painting was complete. My friend decided it was too messy and is going to do cold wax & oil.
     Since I had all the equipment out and had one piece begun. . well, I just got hooked. I guess you might say, my spirit became ignited and it kindled a new desire to work in encaustics. I’m on fire. (ok, enough with the puns) I can’t help myself now. But they are all small pieces at this time. I may expand to a larger size for pieces for my opening in June at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts.